Kingdom Exclusion is not for the lover of God

Posted: December 18, 2008 in Kingdom Exclusion
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Kingdom exclusion is not for the believer who wants to follow the Lord. It’s not for the believer who occasionally and repeatedly stumbles and sins. Such believers do not have a sword hanging over their heads ready to fall the moment they slip up. Scripture abounds in the mercy of God. Revelation 2-3 recounts the problems people have in the churches. Does God give them up immediately? No, He warns them of dire consequences if they continue in sin and of great promises if they overcome their sin. He shows us the correct way to go and gives us time to repent.

In His kindness, He gives us every opportunity to get right with Him, and He is patient with our growth. Paul, a confessed blasphemer, rejoiced in God’ patience: “However, for this reason I obtained mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might show all longsuffering, as a pattern to those who are going to believe on Him for everlasting life” (1 Tim. 1:16). The Scriptures repeatedly tell us to be patient as well, and not to give up when we turn aside to error, sin, or encounter trials. “that ye be not sluggish, but imitators of them who through faith and patience inherit the promises” (Heb. 6:12).

Here is the blessed truth for Christians who want to grow in their faith: “But if we walk in the light as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanses us from all sin” (1 John 1:7). If we continue in fellowship with God, God continually cleanses us of sins.

When I read books by pastors on passages regarding judgment, they frequently say that we will not be judged; our sins will not be brought up at the judgment seat of Christ. One of the reasons they can say this confidently is because the pastors are speaking to those who love the Lord and want to learn of Him more. They want to grow in faith and grace. They serve the Lord and grieve when they let Him down. These people are in the perfect place of grace and glory. Such believers are not the object of God’s wrath and rod, His law is in their hearts:

“This is the covenant that I will make with them After those days, saith the Lord: I will put my laws on their heart, And upon their mind also will I write them; then saith he, And their sins and their iniquities will I remember no more” (Heb 10:16-17).

On this site I cover verses that warn Christians who have turned away from a life of faith. The danger is that of sowing what we reap. “For he who sows to his flesh will of the flesh reap corruption, but he who sows to the Spirit will of the Spirit reap everlasting life” (Gal. 6:8). The responsibility lies with the individual – the choice is ours. If we wish to persevere in ungodliness, God will let us, but we will pay the price the warnings foretold. “And let us not grow weary while doing good, for in due season we shall reap if we do not lose heart” (Gal. 6:9).

The good news is that the warnings are there to stir the Christian back to holiness of life. I have found the warnings nudging me from sinful considerations repeatedly. Do not shy away from them, but let them warn you. Let them turn you back to the blessed way. Like the Ten Commandments, the warnings serve to convict us of sin and turn us back to the Savior.

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Comments
  1. […] Husting: KE not for the lover of God Friday, December 19th, 2008 | admin |  Print This Post Steve Husting, an advocate of Kingdom Exclusion, offers these words on the subject: Kingdom exclusion is not for the believer who wants to follow the Lord. It’s not for the believer who occasionally and repeatedly stumbles and sins. Such believers do not have a sword hanging over their heads ready to fall the moment they slip up (source). […]

  2. From the poster’s page above:

    … Husting writes that KE is not for the believer who “occasionally and repeatedly stumbles and sins,” but for the one who has fallen away. How do we define falling away? How do we judge such things? Do we know the mind of God?

    [Steve’s reply] Yes, we do know the mind of God – He has revealed His mind in the Word. In Matt. 24:45-51 we find one who enters the kingdom with honor and one who is rejected from the kingdom. There are enough clues there to determine what will qualify or disqualify a person.

    … God demands that we be absolutely perfect, as he is perfect. Does Husting’s gospel excuse a certain amount of sin? Is there a certain amount of sin that is tolerable? Does God wish for us to walk the middle way? Or, is there a certain amount that God forgives, but a certain amount he does not forgive?”

    [Steve’s reply] LOL! I plainly write that the warnings are to bring a believer back to holiness of life, not to tolerate sin! [smile]. I wrote above, “the warnings serve to convict us of sin and turn us back to the Savior.”

    “If we embrace that God demands absolute perfection, we embrace grace, for there is no other way to achieve perfection. But if we embrace that our sins, ‘occassionally and repeatedly’ committed, are tolerable, we reject grace, for we assume that some sin is forgiven by the blood of Jesus, some not, and we advance the claim that righteousness is by works.”

    [Steve’s reply] I’ve written hundreds of devotionals, many of which are posted in my Living with the End in View Yahoo Group. They acknowledge dependence on the grace of God for any meaningful walk with God. Many stress victory over sin and the cross through which the flesh is crucified by the power of God. Grace is absolutely essential. The worker in Matt. 24 who received grace to remain faithful in his work went on to receive honor in the kingdom. The poster above assumed the opposite of what I regularly reach just because I did not mention the subject in this one article, LOL!

    I am puzzled over why someone should think that I teach that sin should and can be “embraced” when I’ve noted that “as we sow, so we reap.” If we choose to sin, we will reap the consequences.