Weinre, which is short for Web Inspector Remote (pronounced “winery,” “wine-ray,” “whiner,” or “weiner,” depending on your native accent or sense of humor), allows us to debug our mobile app code remotely, that is, in a desktop browser window outside the mobile device. Why would we do this? Because checking our HTML/CSS/Javascript during development in a browser doesn’t necessarily mean it’ll run flawlessly in the target mobile device. The environments are different. Also, 9 times out of 10, the device has poorly integrated debugging of its own.

How steep is the learning curve for this tool? Well, if you are habiitually using Google Chromes’s Javascript Console (in Google Chrome, click on the wrench icon > Tools > Javascript Console), then you’ll quickly grasp this tool (which is WebKit’s Web Inspector), since they are the same tools, with the addition of one extra tab in Weinre for Remote.

Currently, Weinre, developed by Patrick Mueller, only works in Webkit-based browsers like Google and Safari, as used in iPhone and Android devices. Here are the steps to download and install the software tool, and get it running on an iPod touch device running an app which uses Cordova PhoneGap. These steps are extremely thorough, designed for newbies to coding. (You’re welcome.) Read the rest of this entry »

I’ve changed my web site host to one that supports WordPress, and am gradually moving my blogs there. I’ve separated Doubt Busters into its own blog so the articles would be easier to search. Take a look at it here: http://www.stevehusting.com/doubtbusters/

“How can you prove that God exists?”
“Why did an angry God kill everyone at the Flood?”
“If God is all-powerful, why doesn’t he stop all suffering?”
“Why would the law put a child to death for hitting or cursing his parents?”

These age-old Bible difficulties have caused many people to question the Christian faith. They are tough questions, but they have solid, satisfying answers that can banish your doubts. In this section, Doubt Busters will answer these questions with a friendly, readable style using Bible passages, personal anecdotes, and analogies from nature. The author drew from his years of preaching and writing devotionals to write plainly and root his answers in the word of God.

Who should read this? Doubt Busters is perfect for those whose faith is being crippled by nagging doubts, for it gives plain yet full answers to perplexing Bible questions. It’s a terrific resource for those who want to share their faith, and want to answer the questions that come their way. It’s a great read for young people who are just starting to think about what their faith means to them.

This Doubt Busters online resource is also available in print, as an iPhone app, and on the Kindle as an ebook.

What does the “pre” refer to in the words pre-tribulation and pre-wrath? It refers to an event that occurs prior to another event. Specifically, it refers to the rapture, the removal of people from the earth, before either a 7-year tribulational period or a shorter period of wrath.

Information has come to light regarding many inconsistencies in the pre-tribulation position, which has caused many to depart from that doctrine to embrace the doctrine of the pre-wrath rapture. In his book, The Pre-Wrath Rapture of the Church, Marvin Rosenthal gives us several reasons why the pre-wrath rapture timing has convinced people of having a better foundation on the truth of God’s word. Read the rest of this entry »

Does it matter when the rapture happens? Yes, for the Lord tells us in Revelation 2-3 that there are three different scenarios that different groups in the church will face if the rapture is pre-wrath. Those three ways are rapture, martyrdom, and death by the Lord. Read the rest of this entry »

One group of Christians which strongly makes its voice heard regarding readiness for the end times believe that we must keep the sabbath law or we will be damned – all our efforts will be for nothing. Once one of these believers detect that you are not keeping the sabbath (which includes worshiping on Saturday), then all of your warnings and teachings are thrown out the window. You will miss the Rapture. You will not be in the kingdom. You are an idolater who should burn forever.

Does the sabbath’s importance really carry this much weight? Did God intend for the sabbath day observance to be our highest priority, that without it all our holy practices to be like Christ will fail? Let’s examine the passages regarding the sabbath in the Old Testament and the New. The scriptures are where I get my teachings, so I will ignore the writings of the many believers who insist on keeping the sabbath. You can use an online Bible search and search the Word for “sabbath,” as I did for this study. If I read these sabbath Scriptures myself, will I end up with the same conclusions as the sabbath-lovers do?

Read the rest of this entry »

A Clear Sentence

Posted: June 11, 2009 in How To
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“A clear sentence is no accident,” wrote William Zinsser in On Writing Well. We can’t write clearly unless we understand exactly what point we’re trying to get across. Take the sentence, “The dog ate the food.” That seems clear enough. But compare it to this: “The German Shepherd snapped up the scraps of rabbit meat his master tossed him over the rugged table.” That sentence tells me that the writer has a clearer grasp of what he’s trying to convey. Read the rest of this entry »

One reason why I would have no incentive to prepare for Christ’s coming is if I believe the Rapture of the church includes all members of the church, without exception. For other believers, the promise of a Rapture from a loving Savior prompts them to lay down their lives for Him in gratitude. This is a wonderful response to the Rapture promise, but it is not shared by those whose love for the Savior is absent.

To those of you who are lukewarm in your affections for the Lord, and are depending on a universal Rapture, what if I could show you that the Rapture is conditional? We’ll find in Revelation chapters two and three that Jesus makes a difference among believers regarding who will be rewarded and who will not. One of the conditional rewards offered is the Rapture. Read the rest of this entry »

People who are against any form of KE (and various forms do exist) usually insist on challenging the idea that KE is temporary. This means that they believe either KE is eternal or non-existent in the first place. (For the record, I believe it is temporary. I lay out that argument here.) Let’s assume for the sake of argument that KE is not temporary. What are the ramifications of that position for the following passage? Read the rest of this entry »

This slide show by Steve Husting answers an age-old question that has troubled many people. Let’s look behind the scenes of the question and see what actually occurred at the time of the Flood. This slide show, based on a chapter from Steve’s book, Doubt Busters, will help remove crippling doubts about the fairness of God in passing judgment.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10y8ilK3E54

“Not everyone who says to Me ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father I heaven” (Matt. 7:21)

Jesus frequently mentioned heaven (a.k.a. the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of God). In this instance He gave us a qualification for entering it. You would think entrance should be by faith alone. Jesus tells us plainly that entrance requires obedience to the Father’s will – of having His words and doing them. Isn’t it supposed to be by faith alone? Is this a contradiction in the Bible? Read the rest of this entry »

Grace and the Kingdom

Posted: December 20, 2008 in Kingdom Exclusion
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We cannot make it to the throne in glory apart from the grace of God. What is “grace”? How does it work? Are there rules governing when it applies and when it does not? May this brief study of grace help you to make wise decisions that bring you to the judgment seat of Christ with joy! Read the rest of this entry »

Kingdom exclusion is not for the believer who wants to follow the Lord. It’s not for the believer who occasionally and repeatedly stumbles and sins. Such believers do not have a sword hanging over their heads ready to fall the moment they slip up. Scripture abounds in the mercy of God. Read the rest of this entry »

When conversing with Christians in Christian forums, I’ve come across those who believe that all Christians will inevitably end up in the kingdom of God because of the grace of God (Calvinism). This means, of course, that there is no kingdom exclusion – period – for such believers. According to this view, if a person falls away, then he was never saved to begin with. This person is commonly called a “professing Christian” by the Calvinists. This is distinct from those who are “true Christians.”

In theory, the idea that the saved will always be saved and those to be punished must not have been saved in the first place sounds plausible. But when I examine specific warning verses with the theory in mind, the theory falls apart. Read the rest of this entry »

Here are my observations of the conversation recorded in the comments under “Exploring Kingdom Exclusion” at an earlier date.

Rev. 20 shows us the punishment of the Devil, who is bound for a thousand years (Rev. 20:1-3). This would be a good place to show that Christians would be excluded from the kingdom for a thousand years also. Nevertheless, many details are absent from Revelation, such as the rapture occurring in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye. Such details we find outside of Revelation. May we not need to look elsewhere to find Christians excluded from the kingdom for a thousand years? We’ll find Christians excluded from the kingdom in Gal. 5:21. The question is, is it for a thousand years, never, or for ever? Read the rest of this entry »